Agios Georgios at Galatsi, located on Veikou avenue, also known as Omorfokklisia, dates from the late 12th century and is characterized as cross-in-square, with a chapel on the southern side, probably contemporary with the church, with an octagonal Athenian type dome and bricks circumferentially.

 The beauty of the church has given it the name Omorfoklissia, which in Greek means beautiful church. The church is distinguished and admired not only for its exterior appearance but also for its interior, with exceptional wall paintings dating from the last quarter of the 13th century, which cover almost all the interior surfaces of the church, while equally important are the wall paintings of the chapel.

 An important part of the wall paintings found both in the church and the chapel have been destroyed in the course of time and the rather brutal behavior of people who did not respect them. However, time has failed to erase the depictions of the faces.

 Scenes of the martyrdom of Saint George, the Apostles Peter and Paul, the Virgin Mary with the archangels, Matthew the Evangelist, Prophets, Hierarchs, and Ascetics, and the Almighty at the dome, continue to impress with their excellent art. In the Chapel, what impresses is the Last Supper and the Hospitality of Abraham.

 The three different sections of the church have been painted by different painters, and analyses regarding the art style that has been applied can be found in several studies and writings.