The imaret (Turkish word meaning poorhouse or building complex including a mosque) of Komotini, which is of Islamic architecture, is a designated monument, which houses the Ecclesiastical Museum of the Holy Metropolis of Maroneia and Komotini. According to the traditions of the inhabitants of Komotini, there where the imaret was built was located the Byzantine church of Agia Sophia, upon which was integrated the construction of the building.

 The imaret, which is among the oldest surviving Ottoman monuments of Europe (early 1360 AD), was originally built by the Ottoman Gazi Ahmet Evrenos. In the 19th century, when the city of Komotini was occupied by the Bulgarians, the eastern part of the Ottoman complex was converted into a church, while in 1924 an ice factory was put up there and some other spaces were used occasionally by various services such as the electrical lighting service of the city.

 The restoration works began in 1994 with the replacement of the windows according to their original shape and form, the masonry where necessary, and the replacement of the tiled roof. The conversion was completed in 1999 and ever since it houses the Ecclesiastical Museum of the Holy Metropolis of Maroneia and Komotini, with religious exhibits from the16th up to the 20th century, such as icons, vestments, and sacred vessels.